#2:  “Is Jesus Glorified in Your Life?

Series:  The Other Lord’s Prayer

#2:  “Is Jesus Glorified in Your Life?

John 17:6-10 (NRSV)

As any preacher can tell you, one of the challenges of being a pastor is listening to people’s critiques of you.  But throughout my ministry I have had no greater critics than my own children.  They have kept me humble!  Growing up, our middle son Ben, often complained whenever I offered the Pastoral Prayer.  “Why do you have to pray so long?”

I confess that I would sometimes get carried away and pray long prayers – long enough to cause my children to squirm or fall asleep.  I suppose I’m still guilty of long prayers.  But when it comes to long prayers, I can’t begin to compete with Jesus.  According to John’s Gospel, Jesus was prone to long drawn out prayers, too. And at least his Disciples didn’t seem to mind.

This morning we are continuing our reflections in our sermon series on the longest prayer of Jesus we find in any of the Gospels.  The entire 17thchapter of John is devoted to recording this prayer of Jesus; a prayer he offered to his Father on behalf of his Disciples, and through their witness, on behalf of all those who would later come to believe in Christ.  We are humbled and amazed to realize that, in the final hours before he was to be arrested, tried and crucified, Jesus was praying for you and me!

Last Sunday, the focus was on God’s Glory, and that Jesus came into the world for the purpose of transmitting God’s glory to us.  We heard Jesus ask that in the cross, the Father might glorify the Son, so that the world might give glory to God.  The theme in the first five verses of the prayer was God’s Glory.

This morning, as we pick up with the 6thverse, the focus shifts.  The emphasis isn’t so much on the status of Christ as the Son of God, as it is on the faith of the Disciples in believing in Jesus as the Son of God.  The theme is not centered around God’s Glory – but on God’s Name.

According to the New Revised Standard Version which I’ve chosen for our scripture this morning, Jesus prays, “I have made your name known to those whom you gave me from the world…”  “I have made your name known…”

Now, if you were to pull out your Bible and read this verse, there is a good probably it wouldn’t read exactly that way – it may say nothing about the “name” of God at all.  Instead, many translations will have Jesus say something like, “I have revealed you to them…”  I suppose that is an OK translation –  In general, that’s what the verse means.  But that isn’t what the Greek original says.  Jesus literally prayed, “I have made your name known…”

Now, why is that significant?  Because the “Name of God” has special meaning in scripture. To simply translate this verse, “I have revealed you…” misses a lot of the depth of meaning – we fail to see some of what Jesus is saying here.

If you have been in Bible Studies or heard many sermons in your life, you probably already are aware that there is great significance given to Names in the Bible – much more so than names mean in our day.  So, what might Jesus have meant when he prayed, “I have made your name known?”

I think he probably meant it in a number of different ways:

First, in biblical times, names were more than mere labels, simply some random collection of syllables we use to distinguish ourselves from one another.  A name in Bible times did  “not simply mean the name by which a person is called.  It means the whole character of the person in so far as it can be known.”1

Even today, we have this concept.  We speak of trying to protect our good name, or making a name for ourselves.  We lament when our name has been besmirched, or when we have brought shame on our family name.  Our names and our identities are inseparable.

We see this in the names of those we read about in scripture:  A name in those days had great meaning – it often described the circumstances of a person’s birth, a blessing upon the child, or their characteristics or the role they would play in the salvation story.  For instance, consider the meaning of these biblical names:  Adam = earth being; Eve = mother; Moses = saved from the water; David = Beloved; Daniel = God is my judge; Peter = rock; John = gracious gift of God; Jesus = God is my salvation.  Their names tell us something significant about who they were as people.

Does your name have a meaning?  Is it an accurate description of who you are?

So, names in the Bible often  give us a clue as to the role the person bearing that name would play in the story of Salvation.  They tell us something of their character, of who they really are.

If all this is true for human beings, it is even more true for God.  When scripture refers to the name of God, it is speaking of God’s character and nature.  When we know God’s name, it is a way of saying that we have been given a glimpse into who God truly is – God’s nature and character.

We see this throughout the scriptures;  in Psalm 9:10, “Those who know your name put their trust in you.”  Or, in Psalm 22:22, “I will tell of your name to my brothers and sisters.”  And as Isaiah envisions the new age to come, he quotes God as saying, “My people shall know my name.”  (Is. 52:6)

So, when Jesus says that “I have made your name known,” his is really saying, “I have enabled people to see what the real nature of God is like.. .” It’s another way of saying , “Those who have seen me, have seen the Father.” (John 14:9)

William Barclay, the great Bible commentator, expressed it like this, “It is Jesus’ supreme claim that in him, men see the mind, the character, the heart of God.”1

So, to say that by his life and death Jesus revealed God’s name, that means (first of all) that, as we look at Jesus we are given a glimpse into the very nature and character of God himself.

But there is a second meaning to Jesus’ words.  The phrase “Name of God” may also refer to the Proper Name by which God is known.

Do you remember the story of Moses’ call, where the voice of God speaks to Moses from the burning bush?  After being raised in the palaces of Egypt, Moses had killed an Egyptian taskmaster who was beating an Israelite slave.  He fled into exile in the Land of Midian, where he established a new life for himself as a shepherd.  One day, as he was caring for his flocks, he saw a burning bush that was not consumed, and heard the voice of God, calling him to return to Egypt to confront Pharaoh and liberate the Hebrew people.  As you will remember, Moses tries to weasel out of the assignment, at one point asking, “If I go back, people will want to know the name of the God who sent me.  What should I tell them?”  And God answered by saying; “I am.  Tell them ‘I Am’ has sent you.”

From that day on, the Hebrew people have accepted as the Proper Name of God – a name that is really no name at all; a name that in Hebrew is spelled YHWH, Yahweh (Jehovah in our English Bibles).  It was as if God was saying, “No name is adequate to capture my character, my nature.  It’s enough that you just know that ‘I Am.’”  Now why would God be so evasive with Moses?

God refuses to give an actual name to Moses because of another commonly accepted idea the ancient people had about names.  As we have already seen, names and the persons they name are almost interchangeable.  That led to the belief that if you knew someone’s name, that would give you some mystical power over them.  We even see that in modern times there are those who believe this – for instance, voodoo.  You could use a person’s name in curses, in blessings, in incantations.

Moses and the Israelite people would have loved to have served a God with a name.  In fact, so would we.  With that name we could be in control, we could make God do our bidding. But God wasn’t about to let the Israelites believe he could be manipulated or controlled.  He wasn’t about to give them a name. And so he answered, “I Am.”

I suspect that Jesus may have had this in mind, because all throughout the Gospel of John, we hear Jesus referring to himself with those words. Over and over again, he uses the phrase when speaking of himself:  “I am the Bread of Life.”  “I am the Living Water.”  “I am the Vine.”  “I am the Good Shepherd.”  “I am the Resurrection and the Life.”  It’s as if Jesus was saying to anyone who was listening, “I Am – God!”  It’s no wonder he gets into so much trouble with the religious leaders.  He is making a claim that was considered blasphemy!

When Jesus says in his prayer, “I revealed your name” to my disciples, he may as well have been saying that he was indeed the Son of God, who along with God, was worthy of Glory.

But I think he may have been saying something even more meaningful.  And that is that in Christ, the God who refused to be known completely by the Jewish people, now can be fully known through Jesus.

You see, the name God gave Moses was considered holy… So holy, it was not to ever be spoken.  This was probably to make sure God’s name could never be taken in vain, breaking one of the 10 Commandments.  There was only one exception:  God’s name was allowed to be uttered by the High Priest on the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur), and then, only in the confines of the Holy of Holies of the Temple.  It was a name that was veiled in mystery.

But, of course, the name did appear in written form in the scriptures. How would they guard against the possibility that it might be accidentally voiced?  What they did was to substitute the Hebrew word “Adonai,” a generic word for God, often translated “Lord.”  Every time a person would read from the Torah and came across the name of God, Yahweh, they would substitute the word “Adonai.“

We have this reflected in most English Bibles.  Wherever you see LORD (all caps), you can know that in Hebrew, the name of God appears there.

This emphasis on the holiness of God’s name only served to reinforce the idea that our God is distant and unapproachable – that he is unknowable.

But Jesus says in the prayer, “I have made your name known.” He was telling us that the unknowable God, veiled in mystery, is knowable after all.

Or as Paul writes in Ephesians (2:13):  “In Christ Jesus you, who once were far off, have been brought near by the blood of Christ.”

Listen to the way William Barclay put it:

“In the time of Jesus the name of God was so sacred that ordinary people were not even supposed to know it, far less to speak it.  God was the remote invisible king, whose name was not for ordinary men to speak.  So Jesus is saying: ‘I have told you God’s name; that name which is so sacred can be spoken now because of what I have done.  I have brought the remote, invisible God so close that even the simplest people can speak to him and take his name upon their lips.”1

Wow!  All that from verse 6 of the prayer.  But with that understanding, the other four verses of our text make more sense.  This is what I hear Jesus saying in this part of his prayer:  “Because Jesus has revealed God’s nature and character to us, we accept as truth that Jesus is the Son who has come from the Father.  Therefore, we now belong to God, and our lives are to give glory to Christ.”

Did you catch the movement there:  verse 6-10 actually map out the journey any person makes in coming to faith:  1) Christ reveals God’s love to us, 2)  we accept Christ as Lord and Savior.  3) As a result we belong to God, and 4) our lives give glory to Christ.

So, where are you along that journey of faith?  Have you looked to Jesus, allowing him to reveal the love of God to you?  If so, have you taken the step of accepting Christ as your Lord and Savior? If not, my prayer is that you will do so today.

And for the rest of us, which may be most of us.  We already have accepted Christ, and know we belong to God.  For us, the challenge comes in verse 10, where Jesus says “I have been glorified in them:”  Do our lives give glory to Christ?  Can those around us look at our lives and see Jesus?  If not, then something is wrong, and we need to make it right this morning.

It may be that Christ is not being “glorified” in your life. Maybe you’ve asked Christ into your heart.  Or perhaps, you did at one time, but realize that the life you are living today doesn’t bring glory to Christ.  In a few moments as we sing our final song, you will have the opportunity to come forward to the altar to make things right again in your relationship with God.

In closing, listen with fresh ears to this part of Jesus’ prayer, this time from The Message bible, and take Jesus’ words to heart:

 

“I spelled out your character in detail to the men and women you gave me. They were yours in the first place; Then you gave them to me, and they have now done what you said.  They know now, beyond the shadow of a doubt, that everything you gave me is firsthand from you,  For the message you gave me, I gave them; and they took it, and were convinced that I came from you. They believed that you sent me. I pray for them. I’m not praying for the God-rejecting world but for those you gave me, for they are yours by right.  Everything mine is yours, and yours mine, and my life is on display in them.”

May it be said of all of us, that the life of Christ is on display in us.   Amen.

1Barclay, William.  The Gospel of John, pp. 209-211

#1 The Glory of Christ

Series: The Other Lord’s Prayer

1:  The Glory of Christ

John 17:1-5 (NLT)

Last Sunday, we completed our sermon series on Holy Communion.  This morning, we begin a new series of sermons based on the 17thchapter of John’s Gospel, a series I’m calling “The Other Lord’s Prayer.”

Every Sunday in our church we close our prayer time with the words of Jesus we have come to refer to as “The Lord’s Prayer,” as we ought to.  It’s a wonderful prayer that is worthy of repeating often.  In fact, since I’ve been pastor here at Mims UMC, I have preached a series of sermons on that prayer.

But when you go back and read that familiar prayer in its context within the Gospels, you discover that it isn’t really Jesus’ prayer, so much as it is our prayer.  The Disciples had asked him to teach them how to pray.   And Jesus responded, “When you pray, pray like this: ‘Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name…’”  and then he proceeded to give them a template they should use to guide their own prayer life.

Most all of us are so familiar with that prayer that we have committed it to memory.  But many of us may not be as familiar with the other prayers of Jesus that are recorded in the Gospels. It would be a fascinating study to reflect on each prayer Jesus is reported to have prayed.

But, of all the prayers that passed the lips of Jesus, none compares with the prayer we find recorded in John 17, the one I am calling “The Other Lord’s Prayer;” and some biblical scholars have named Jesus’ “High Priestly Prayer.”  One reason it is significant is that it is by far the longest prayer of Jesus we have – it is an entire chapter long.  But what makes it even more important is where it falls in the events of Jesus’ life.  Jesus launches into this prayer at the close of the Last Supper with his Disciples, just before they leave the Upper Room and Jesus is arrested, tried, and killed.  It is at this most crucial moment, which marks the transition between his ministry and his passion and death, that Jesus offers this prayer.  In a way, the prayer functions as Jesus’ “Farewell” speech – a prayer that sums up his life and mission, and prepares his Disciples to carry on after he has left them.

And that is perhaps the paramount reason for us to focus on this prayer of Jesus – because in it, he prays for his followers – both his Disciples in the room with him that night, as well as for all those who would believe in him down through the centuries.  After they left the Upper Room and went to the Garden of Gethsemane, the other Gospels tell us that Jesus prayed an agonizing prayer for himself, asking his Father that, if possible, he might avoid the cross –  but nonetheless, let God’s “will be done.”  In the Garden, Jesus prayed for himself.  But not here.  In John 17, Jesus doesn’t pray for his own concerns or needs.  The focus of Jesus’ prayer in the Upper Room – is on us.  He is interceding with his Father on our behalf.  It’s amazing to realize that, as the agony of the cross loomed and Jesus was preparing to lay down his life for the world, he was thinking of you and me!

So, what is it that Jesus asks God for on our behalf?  During the next six weeks, we will eves drop on his prayer to find out:

This morning, we read just the first five verses of Jesus’ prayer.  But within those few verses we already pick up a theme – Glory!  Four times in these verses, Jesus uses the words glory or glorify.  “Father, the time has come. Glorify your Son so he can give glory back to you…  I brought you glory here on earth by doing everything you told me to do. And now, Father, bring me into the glory we shared before the world began.”

Now, these statements from Jesus don’t strike us as particularly radical – we’ve all grown up assuming that we should give glory to Jesus.  But when Jesus spoke them in that Upper Room, it would have caused quite a stir among his followers.  That’s because throughout the Jewish scripture, the only one worthy of receiving glory is God himself.  References in the Bible to God’s glory are almost too many to count:

“Then the cloud covered the tent of meeting, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle.” (Ex. 40:34)

“Declare his glory among the nations, his marvelous works among all the peoples.” (1 Chron 16:24)

“The heavens are telling the glory of God; and the firmament proclaims his handiwork.” (Ps. 19:1)

“Lift up your heads, O gates! and be lifted up, O ancient doors! that the King of glory may come in.” (Ps. 24:7)

“Glory to God in the highest, and on earth, peace…” (Luke 2)

Only God is worthy of Glory.  But here, Jesus uses the glory language to refer to himself.  “Glorify your Son… bring me into my glory…”  Jesus is declaring that He and the Father are both worthy of Glory.  It’s as if here, as he prepares for his rendezvous with destiny, Jesus is declaring in no uncertain terms his identity as the Son of God, the second person of the Trinity.  Throughout his ministry, over and over Jesus says, “My time has not yet come.”  But now in the Upper Room, he declares that His hour had finally come.  It was time to lay it all on the line.  It was time for him to be glorified before the world.

What Jesus is referring to, of course, is the cross.  It is in laying down his life for our sakes, that Jesus reveals the glory of God. And it is in the willingness of Jesus to endure the cross that we witness the glory of God’s Son.  Jesus prays that he is willing to suffer the shame of the cross if that is what it would take for all the world to behold the glory of God.

So, Christ’s glory is revealed, most perfectly in the cross.  But this glory isn’t a new status for Jesus. According to John’s Gospel, Christ has always and will always be worthy of glory.  It is in John’s Gospel that we are told that Jesus is the Logos, the Word of God that spoke all creation into existence, and it is John that emphasizes that after the cross, Jesus will return to the Father to share God’s glory eternally.  John is the one who quotes Jesus saying, “I am the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end.”  For John, Jesus has always and will always be worthy of glory.

In fact, in order to make sense of this prayer, we have to understand this insight that John has about the work of Christ.  Bible scholars who study John’s Gospel tell us that for John, there is a pattern of descent and ascent – that Jesus came down to earth from glory (the Word made flesh that dwelt among us), revealed his glory on the cross, and returned to reign with the Father in glory.

The way John describes the mission of Christ reminds me of the old stories of the gallant knights of old that were sent out from the castle to kill that dragon and rescue the damsel in distress, bringing her back with him to the castle in victory, so that he might marry her and they might live happily ever after.

The story of Jesus as John tells it is like that.  Jesus, the ultimate “knight in shining armor,” is sent from heaven on a rescue mission, and we are the prize.  In the cross he defeats the dragon, proclaims victory, and brings his bride, the Church, back to the castle to live happily ever after.

Peter captures the same idea in his first Letter.  He writes, “You know that you were ransomed from the futile ways inherited from your ancestors, not with perishable things like silver or gold, but with the precious blood of Christ, like that of a lamb without defect or blemish.  He was destined before the foundation of the world, but was revealed at the end of the ages for your sake.  Through him you have come to trust in God, who raised him from the dead and gave him glory, so that your faith and hope are set on God.” (1 Peter 1:18-21)

So, in our prayer, Jesus prays that in his obedience to his mission, the Son has given glory to his Father.  And now as he completes his mission on the cross, the Father will glorify him.  And the only reason for this elaborate rescue mission – that you and I might have the opportunity to experience eternal life. We are the damsel in distress, who needs rescuing from the dragon.  We are the object of God’s passion and love.

With that in mind, I think there are four insightsthese five verses we should hears – ways the glory of Christ reveal God’s love for us:

The first thing we can learn from Jesus’ prayer is that Christ came into the world to reveal God’s Glory.

This is obvious by what I have just said.  Jesus says this plainly in the 12thchapter of John “Whoever believes in me believes not in me but in him who sent me. 45 And whoever sees me sees him who sent me.” (v 44-45)

As you may know from my recent sermon series on the four gospels, each of the four gospel writers presents a little different picture of who Jesus is.  As I mentioned in my sermon on the Gospel of John, one of my seminary professors described John’s understanding of Jesus like this. He said it’s like taking a piece of onion skin paper (some of us a little older will know what that is), and writing with a magic marker the word GOD on one side and JESUS on the other. When you hold up to the light the side that says Jesus, God shows through.  That’s how John describes the mission of Jesus:  When we look at Jesus, we can see the glory of God.

The next insight from our scripture this morning follows naturally from the first:  You and I can also access the Glory of God, but only when we acknowledge, recognize, and accept the glory of the God’s Son.

Jesus makes this clear over and over in John’s Gospel.  It is in this gospel that Jesus says, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.”

This claim that Jesus is the only way to God is sometimes called “The Scandal of Particularity,” the assertion by the Christian Church that, because Jesus as the second person of the Trinity is the pure revelation of God, and because of the transformative work of Christ on the cross, there is only one way to have full access to the Father – and that is through faith in Jesus Christ.  In our pluralistic and politically correct society, this claim to particularity is scandalous, and makes many people in our society uncomfortable, even some within the church.  But no matter how you feel about this understanding of salvation, no one can deny that scripture is clear – especially in John – that faith in Jesus is the key to salvation and eternal life.

Hear Jesus’ words again, this time from John 6:38-40;  “I have come down from heaven, not to do my own will, but the will of him who sent me.  And this is the will of him who sent me, that I should lose none of those he has given me, but raise them up on the last day.  This is indeed the will of my Father, that all who see the Son and believe in him may have eternal life; and I will raise them up on the last day.”

And of course, from our text this morning, Jesus prays, ”For you have given (the Son) authority over everyone in all the earth. He gives eternal life to each one you have given him.  And this is the way to have eternal life – to know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, the one you sent to earth.”

John is pretty clear – access to the Father is possible only through the Son.  We must recognize the Glory of Christ if we are to hope to see the Glory of God.

The third insight we can glean from the first part of Jesus’ prayer is this:  While faith is Christ is key to our salvation, that salvation is available to all people.  Everyone has access to God’s Glory through Christ.

As I just quoted from the prayer, ”For you have given (the Son) authority over everyone in all the earth. He gives eternal life to each one you have given him.”  Or even more plainly, we find this truth in John 3:16, “For God so loved the world that gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish but have everlasting life…”

There are some Christian groups and denominations who teach that God has predestined (or predetermined) who should be saved and who should be damned.  That is not our Wesleyan or United Methodist belief. We actually believe Jesus actually meant what he said in John 3:16:  “that whosoeverbelieveth in him should not perish but have everlasting life.”

My favorite seminary professor put it like this, “John 3:16 is God’s ‘Yes’ to the world; if there is (a) ‘No,’ the world will have to say it.”1

Charles Wesley, the great Methodist hymn writer, put this truth to poetry in his hymn, Come, Sinners, to the Gospel Feast:

Come, sinners, to the gospel feast;

let every soul be Jesus’ guest.

Ye need not one be left behind,

for God hath bid all humankind.

Christ came to offer salvation to ALL – it is God’s hope and desire that EVERY soul will accept his invitation to the Gospel Feast – In Christ, “God hath bid ALL humankind.”

The final lesson from our morning scripture is wonderful news for each of us.  Because Christ has returned to heaven to share God’s glory, Christ has sent the Holy Spirit to us so that the Glory of God can shine through us.

I said that only God is worthy of Glory – certainly not us.  But when we give Christ the glory he is due, the glory of God comes to rest upon us!

In the chapter that immediately precedes this prayer of Jesus, he says this to his disciples:

“The Father himself loves you, because you have loved me and have believed that I came from God.  I came from the Father and have come into the world; again, I am leaving the world and am going to the Father.”  “I tell you the truth: it is to your advantage that I go away, for if I do not go away, the Advocate will not come to you; but if I go, I will send him to you.”  (16:27-28, 7)

Paul also teaches us in his Letter to the Romans, that in Christ, we can share God’s Glory:  “Therefore, since we are justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have obtained access  to this grace in which we stand; and we  boast in our hope of sharing the glory of God.” (Rom 5:1-2)

What both John and Paul are telling us is that the mission of Christ’s coming into the world was to transfer God’s glory to you and me!  The Glory of God – can rest on US!

I’m not much into sports, but I love watching the Olympic games.  The couple of weeks when the Games are held captivate the world’s attention.  But preparations for the games begin long before.  Weeks before the Games begin, the Olympic flame must make a long and arduous journey, from the moment it is kindled in Greece, then carried by relay runners throughout the world, until it finally reaches its destination, and the caldron is lit at the opening ceremonies.

I think that image sums up what Jesus is saying about the glory he came to share.  Like the runner who carries the Olympic flame, Jesus bears the glory of God from the heights of heaven, through the dark valleys of the world, until that glory is lit within the caldron of our hearts. We are not complete until the flame of God’s glory burns within us!

Paul expresses it like this in 2 Cor. 4:6: “For it is the God who said, ‘Let light shine out of darkness,’ who has shone in our hearts to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.”

So, the challenge we hear from this part of Jesus’ prayer is this:  Do you recognize the Son that God has sent?  Have you beheld the glory of the Son of God, so that God’s glory might come to rest on you?

If not, my prayer for you during this sermon series, is that, as you behold the Glory of Christ on the cross, you might finally see there the Glory of God.

For it’s just as Paul wrote in Second Thessalonians:  “For this purpose (God)called you through our proclamation of the good news, so that you may obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ.” (2 Thes. 2:14)

1 Fred Craddock. John.  John Knox Press 1982. p. 12

We Are What We Eat

Series: “Taste and See”
#5: “We Are What We Eat”
John 6:47-56 and 1 Corinthians 10:16-17 (NLT)

Today, we have come to the final Sunday in our series on the Lord Supper, the Banquet of God’s Grace spread before us. Throughout this series, I hope you have begun to experience Holy Communion as far more than just a ritual of remembrance, something rote that has little impact on your life. I trust that, by now you are beginning to get an inkling of the transformative power of the sacrament – that as we break the bread and share the cup together each one of us is experiencing the presence of Christ – that we are finding that, as we feed on Christ each Sunday, we are strengthened in our faith and nourished for our journey.

Throughout this series, we have gained a richer understanding of Holy Communion. The first week we learned that remembrance is an action verb – that as we reenact that Last Supper, we are doing more than just recalling an event in ancient history, we are participating in it and are changed by the experience. The second week, we were reminded that, while Holy Communion is based on the meal Jesus shared with his disciples on the eve of his crucifixion, it also calls to mind the Easter supper on the road to Emmaus where the risen Christ was “known in the breaking of the bread.” Two weeks ago, we were reminded how, in the great banquet in the Kingdom of God, God will go out of his way to welcome anyone and everyone who will respond to the invitation to sit at his table. Then last week, we were reminded of the bounty of God’s grace that is available to us all, and how God multiplies His love through us as we share spiritual “Bread” with those who are starving for God.

Now, as we come to the close of our series on Holy Communion, I’d like for us to reflect on why it is that Jesus commands us to eat his body and drink his blood when we share in the bread and wine of communion. As we read in our scripture for today, Jesus says, “Unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you cannot have eternal life within you.” If you’re like most people, that verse makes you cringe – in fact, it’s sort of grotesque to imagine, it sounds as if Christians are called to be cannibalistic. We know that isn’t true – in our tradition we don’t believe that the bread and wine change substance – that they gorging on are actually the physical body and blood of Christ. And yet, Jesus is very clear that unless we feed on him, we cannot know eternal life: He says plainly, “Anyone who eats my flesh and drinks by blood remains in me and I in him.” We are to eat Jesus. So, what happens to us when we eat the bread and wine of Holy Communion? To understand that, we have to reflect on what it means to eat, and what it means to go hungry.

Eating is essential to life. It is something we take for granted, until we don’t have enough food to eat. And then, eating becomes all we can think about. But few of us know anything about that.

You and I live in one of the wealthiest nations on earth where so much food spoils in our refrigerators, in our fields, and on our grocery store shelves, that it would be enough to feed the entire population of some third world countries. While it is true that there are some people in our own nation who go hungry at night, the vast majority of us, not only have access to plenty of food, we struggle with ways to prevent ourselves from over-eating. For us, the problem is not “famine” but “obesity.” We ingest too much food – and, too much of the wrong types of food.

You see, just because we have available to us a veritable cornucopia of foods doesn’t mean that we eat well. In America, our “malnutrition” is self-imposed.
Just consider most American families. We have to make certain that all of us take vitamin supplements every day because we don’t eat a very balanced diet. The majority of families today have schedules that are so crowded that there often is no time to prepare a balanced healthy meal, so we tend to eat on the go. We will drive-thru and grab a burger and fries, or get take-out. Or sometimes we will just settle for a handful of cookies or crackers, and call it supper.

It’s not surprising, then, that more and more people are facing health problems. The increase in heart disease, cancer, hypertension, diabetes, and many other ailments have been linked to poor diet. It seems that the old maxim may be truer than we want to admit: “You are what you eat.”

If that is true, then we shouldn’t be surprised that, when God wanted to come up with a way to illustrate what it means to be a follower of Jesus, he used a meal to do it. If “we are what we eat,” then it is of utmost importance what we eat, because that will determine our health and vitality.

All human beings need to eat, both physically and spiritually. And just as we can fill our stomachs with junk food and empty calories that do our body little good (and may do them harm), so we often seek out spiritual junk food that leaves us spiritually unsatisfied and malnourished.

Our culture today is a smorgasbord of philosophies, cults, worldviews, and religions that Americans freely sample, hoping they will satisfy – only to discover that they still have that gnawing hunger for meaning and purpose in their lives. You see, “they are what they eat” – they are gorging on empty spiritual calories that cannot satisfy. They don’t realize it, but they long for the banquet table of God – the only food that can fill their emptiness and give them life.

In the Gospel of Luke, Jesus tells the story of a man and his two sons. You probably know it, The Parable of the Prodigal Son. If you’ll recall, in the story, the younger son takes his inheritance and sets off into “the far country” to “live it up” on his own, and soon discovers that he has made a terrible mistake. It’s interesting that in the story, there are two references to “eating” that I think beautifully illustrate the vast difference between the junk food of the world, and the spiritual banquet that God offers. The Prodigal Son follows the ways of the world, squanders his inheritance, and ends up trying to survive eating pig slop. But then he remembers the dinner table back home at his father’s house, a feast overflowing with wonderful things to eat. And so, he comes home looking for leftovers, but the father will not hear of it – he kills the fatted calf and throws party, because his lost son is home again.

Our scriptures for this morning also tell us that it makes a huge difference how we go about trying to satisfy the spiritual hunger we all feel. We can eat the pig slop the world offers, or we can share in the banquet of grace that God provides. The diet which the world offers is unsatisfying and leads to death. The food that God provides brings fulfillment and eternal life.

As Jesus said in John’s Gospel, “I am the Bread of Life! Your ancestors ate manna in the wilderness, but they all died. Anyone who eats the bread from heaven . . . will live forever.” Or, he could have simply said, “You are what you eat, so feed on me.”

To say “we are what we eat” in relation to the Lord’s Supper means that something transformative happens when we partake in Holy Communion – we are somehow changed. Eating the body and blood of Jesus together brings about two transformations: it changes us individually, and it changes us corporately.
First, let’s see how eating Jesus’ body and blood changes us individually:
When Jesus says, “this is my body” and “this is my blood,” the early Christians would not have been grossed out and sickened at the thought. They knew Jesus wasn’t speaking literally. He was drawing upon concepts the ancients were very familiar with.
In all ancient religions, animals were sacrificed to their gods as part of their worship. Typically, in pagan cults, the entire animal was dedicated and offered, but only a portion of it would be burned up on the altar. Portions would be given to the priests as their share and to provide them meat to eat. And a portion would be given to the worshiper to consume at a feast to be shared in the god’s honor. It was believed that, when an animal was sacrificed to a god, that god’s spirit resided with the animal, so that anyone who ate the flesh of the sacrifice would actually be taking into their body the spirit and strength of the god. They literally became what they ate – or so they believed.
This is precisely what Paul is giving advice about in First Corinthians, in the sections that come before and after our text this morning. The issue was whether or not a Christian could eat meat that had been sacrificed to one of the pagan gods. If you know that text, you remember that Paul said it wasn’t tainted meat, since the god to which it was offered didn’t exist. But he also said that, if it bothered anyone in the church, everyone should refrain from eating that meat, so not to cause a fellow believer to stumble in his or her faith.

So it’s clear that the early followers of Jesus would have understood the implications of what Jesus was saying when he said they must “eat his flesh.” They must “feed” on him to receive his spirit and his strength.

But, what about Jesus’ instruction to “drink my blood?” To us, that sounds ghoulish, as if we are supposed to become vampires. But any Jew who heard this allusion to blood would have understood the power of that command.

In the Old Testament, Jews were forbidden to drink blood. When animals were slaughtered, they took great care to make certain that all the blood was drained from the carcass before it was eaten. That is because they believed that blood represented life, and that life was given by God – so that meant that blood was sacred. In the temple, when sacrifices were offered, the blood ran freely from the place of sacrifice, and some was splattered in the holy of holies. Why? – because the blood was sacred and was the giver of life.

So, when Jesus commanded that we must drink his blood, he was saying that this most sacred life-giving blood that belongs to God himself, poured out on the cross of Calvary would convey life to all who would receive it. As we sing sometimes, “There is power, power, wonderworking power in the blood of the Lamb.” Again, we are what we eat.

So, when you and I receive the body and blood of Christ, symbolized by the bread and wine of Holy Communion, something miraculous happens: our lives are transformed. In a mysterious way we can’t quite explain, the spirit of Jesus that is present as we eat the bread comes to dwell within us; and the life-giving power of Christ present in the wine that we drink fills us with new and everlasting life. Our lives are changed!
As Paul expressed it in our text from First Corinthians: “When we bless the cup at the Lord’s Table, aren’t we sharing in the blood of Christ? And when we break the bread, aren’t we sharing in the body of Christ?” When we do it by faith, the answer is a resounding, “Yes!”

So, sharing in the body of Christ changes us individually. But an even more amazing transformation happens to those of us who share together in Holy Communion – we are transformed from individual believers partaking of the body of Christ, into the Body of Christ for the world today.

Something incarnational happens in Holy Communion. One of the great theological teachings of the Christian faith is the Doctrine of the Incarnation. The Doctrine of Incarnation (which literally means “enfleshment”) is the belief we emphasize every Advent and Christmas – that God himself chose to enter the world as a human baby, to live life as a man teaching us how we should live in relationship with God, and to die our death so that we might be have everlasting life. God took on a human body, the body of Christ.

We all are familiar with that “incarnation.” But there is another incarnation that happens every time we share in the Lord’s Supper. As we receive the body of Christ, Christ becomes incarnate in us, not just individually, but corporately. That’s why Paul speaks in several places of the church being “a body with many members” with Christ as the head. As he has written in 1 Cor. 12:27 “You are the body of Christ, and each one of you is a part of it.”

When you and I partake of the body of Christ through the sacrament, we are transformed into Christ’s Body in the world – Jesus becomes incarnate in us – Jesus’ mission and ministry in the world becomes our mission and ministry. The Kingdom he came to declare is ours to proclaim and to strive for – we become the hands and feet and mouth of Jesus, his ambassadors of love and grace.

In the 16th century, Teresa of Avila beautifully expressed how, in Holy Communion, Christ becomes incarnate in you and me, his Body in the world. She wrote:

Christ has no body now but yours,
No hands, no feet on earth but yours.
Yours are the eyes with which he looks
with compassion on this world,

Yours are the feet with which he walks to do good,
Yours are the hands, with which he blesses all the world.
Yours are the hands,
Yours are the feet,
Yours are the eyes,
You are his body.

Christ has no body now but yours,
No hands, no feet on earth but yours,
Yours are the eyes with which he looks
with compassion on this world.
Christ has no body now on earth but yours.

Yes, when it comes to the broken body and shed blood of the Lord’s Supper, as we feast on the body of Christ, “we BECOME what we eat.”

So, we have concluded our series on Holy Communion. But the truth is – we have scarcely even begun to scratch the surface of the Lord’s Supper, or to plumb the depths of its significance. In truth, we will never understand all that this sacrament means – it is a holy mystery. That’s the nature of a sacrament – it conveys meaning and the power of God’s grace, even when we can’t explain it. All we can do is offer God prayers of thanksgiving and praise that we can encounter his presence whenever we come to the Table by faith, and there “taste and see that the Lord is good,” indeed!

Multiplying God’s Love

 Series: “Taste and See”

#4:  Multiplying God’s Love (communion version)

John 6:1-15 (NRSV)

By John Gill

Every time a pastor is appointed to a new church, he or she inherits certain traditions and customs started by their predecessor – programs that may be wonderful, but ones that the new pastor probably would not have begun if it had been up to him or her. I know that has been true for me at every new appointment I have received.

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You are Cordially Invited

Series: Taste and See that the Lord is Good

#3:  You Are Cordially Invited…

Luke 14:12-24 (NLT)

By Rev. John Gill

Football season has begun.  How many of you like football?  What is the premier event in the world of football?  The Superbowl, right?  How much would you pay for a ticket to the Superbowl?  For fans, there is nothing more highly prized than a pair of Superbowl tickets on the 50 yard line.  I’m sure those are snapped up almost instantly once they go on sale, and if you waited tool long, would be impossible to get unless you are willing to pay thousands of dollars to a scalper.  Yes, the Superbowl is one of the most exclusive events in all of sports.

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The Other Lord’s Supper

Series: Taste and See that the Lord is Good
#2: The Other Lord’s Supper
Luke 24:13-35 (NIV)
By Rev. John Gill

“It only takes a moment…” Any of you who are Broadway buffs will recognize those as the words a young man named Cornelius sings to Ms. Malloy in the musical “Hello Dolly.” In this song, he declares that, at first sight, he has fallen in love, and that his life has been forever transformed!

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Remembrance is an Action Verb

Sermon Series: “Taste and See”

#1:  “Remembrance is an Action Verb”

1 Corinthians 11:23-26 (NIV)

The story is told of a little girl whose parents had taken her forward to receive Holy Communion. The pastor tore off a piece of bread for her to dip in the cup, and handed it too her.  Disappointed with how small the piece was, she cried out, loud enough for everyone in the sanctuary to hear, “I want more!  I want more!”  While embarrassing to her parents and amusing to the pastor and the congregation, this little girl’s cry accurately expresses the way many of us may feel.  We want more!  We are hungry.  We want more than we are receiving from the sacrament of Holy Communion. Continue reading

Who Jesus Is According to John

“Who Jesus Is, According to John”

John 1:1-5, 10-14;  20:30-31  (NRSV)

By John Gill

I hope you had the chance to read all the way through the Gospel of John this week, as I invited you to last Sunday, because today, the theme for our message is the Gospel of John.  As you probably are aware, this is the final sermon in a series I am preaching on “Who Jesus is, according to” each of the writers of the four Gospels – each gospel writer answers that question a little differently, giving us four similar, yet distinctly different portraits of Christ.

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Who Jesus is, according to Luke?

“Who is Jesus, According to Luke?”

Luke 19:10  (NRSV)

By Rev. John Gill

Which of the four Gospels is your favorite Gospel?  Have you ever asked yourself that question?  Even though most all of us appreciate aspects of each of the Gospels, there is usually one that particularly resonates with us, for one reason or another – the Gospel we turn to first when we want to read the story of Jesus.  Which Gospel speaks most powerfully to you?  Let’s do a quick poll by a show of hands:

Matthew?    Mark?    Luke?    John?    Can’t decide?

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